1. The Pier




View from the beach of False bay, Cape Town.

The studio is informed by the history of radical thinking about architecture in the 20th century yet look beyond to the Afro-Imaginary to present an experimental curriculum deploying techniques culled from the visual arts as well as design theories of geography, infrastructure, engineering, and architecture to initiate dialogues about geography and spatiality in an era of global crisis due to human-induced climate change.

More specifically, the studio will investigate the cultural topographies of water informed by the line from colonialism to climate change in consideration of forced-migration, resource extraction, environmental degradation, and water scarcity.





The two kilometer long pier plan.

The project consists on a two-kilometer-long pier that creates a connection between the community of Kayelitsha and the sea. The pier is a public promenade that seeks to reconcile the sea as the main public space. It Agglomerates along its path a series of public facilities and spaces that interact with the surrounding landscape.

The pier itself functions as a device for the generation of energy, knowledge and recreation for the community, hosting a series of programs that relate with the people through water.



The main program of the project consists on a desalination plant, an Olympic pool complex, a series of recreational saline pools and a research sea center that connect each other through a continuous path that transforms into public space.

The project is meant to be a speculative strong gesture that speaks about inequality and access to public space as a right. It is meant to be large enough to be seen along the bay but light enough to allow the view and landscape to be framed and enhanced. It is a response of the historical denial that the community of Kayelitsha suffered from previous apartheid policies and current inequalities.







 
A 5-year drought in and a mixture of mismanagement in the city of Cape Town has created a water scarcity crisis that endangers the whole population.

Several informal settlements and former Townships struggle to get access to water as they are disconnected from the main source regardless the droughts.A 5-year drought in and a mixture of mismanagement in the city of Cape Town has created a water scarcity crisis that endangers the whole population.

Several informal settlements and former Townships struggle to get access to water as they are disconnected from the main source regardless the droughts. Access to water has been denied for the former town ship now informal settlement of Kayelitsha.

Despite being less than one mile from the sea, the community is disconnected by a large private stripe that resulted from previous apartheid policies and current social inequity. The project intends to give a direct connection between the community of Kayelitsha and the sea.










Benjamin Gomez MSAAD ‘20 — New York, Ny
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